People usually think of Pain Management when they suffer from persistent chronic pain: back aches, neck aches, arthritis, headaches, etc. Sometimes pain can be the result of an injury, an infection, or from a surgical procedure. We treat patients who suffer from the following. Please click the condition for more information.

Our “gait” is our pattern of walking. As the name implies, this condition is a deviation from the normal pattern: unsteadiness, unbalanced, or the inability to fully control how you walk are all symptoms. This is usually reflective of more serious conditions, neurological, orthopedic, arthritic, etc.

An ankle sprain occurs when one or more ligaments – fibrous bands of tissue that provide stability to the joint – are stretched or torn from excessive force such as a sudden twisting during sports, stepping on an uneven surface, or a blow to the ankle.

This condition is an irritation or inflammation of the biceps tendon at the shoulder. The biceps tendon helps to stabilize the humerus and aids in activities that involve overhead motion such as tennis or throwing a ball.

This condition is a painful inflammation of the iliotibial band, a thick, tendon-like portion of a muscle that travels from the hip down the outer side of the thigh to the knee. ITBS results in pain, aggravated by activity, that is usually felt on the outer side of the knee.

This condition is a painful compression of a nerve in the wrist that can interfere with a person’s ability to use the wrist and the hand. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a progressive condition that can worsen without proper care.

This condition is an irritation or compression of one or more nerve roots in the cervical spine. Because these nerves travel to the shoulders, arms and hands, an injury in the cervical spine can cause symptoms in these areas. Cervical radiculopathy may result from a variety of problems with the bones and tissues of the cervical spinal column.

This condition, which most often occurs as a complication of long-term diabetes, is a progressive degenerative condition that affects the foot. It is characterized by nerve damage in the foot along with severely weakened foot bones. This combination can result in a person fracturing the foot, but continuing to walk on the broken bones, which leads to debilitating foot deformity.

This chronic condition, also known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy, is an unexplained feeling of pain and discomfort that most commonly affects an arm, leg, hand or foot.  Often, it begins in the hand or foot and then spreads to affect the entire limb.

This debilitating disorder is a type of severe exhaustion that is not improved by bed rest. It can affect anyone, but most commonly affects women in their 40s and 50s. The syndrome is four times more common in women than in men.

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See Meniere’s Disease.

Also known as Cochleovestibular Nerve Compression Syndrome (CNCS), this term describes an impairment of hearing and balance thought to be caused by a blood vessel or benign tumor compressing the cochleovestibular nerve. Balance testing is often used to help in its diagnosis and treatment.

This condition is an inflammation of the tip of the tailbone, called the coccyx. It causes pain and tenderness between the buttocks.

This condition is a compression injury to the ulnar nerve near the elbow. This is the nerve that produces a jolt when you bump your “funny bone.”

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This condition is a weakening of one or more vertebral discs, which normally act as a cushion between the vertebrae. This condition can develop as a natural part of the aging process, but it may also result from injury to the back.

Back pain, leg pain, foot pain, muscle strain may contribute to this condition. Patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome, multiple scelerosis, cerebral palsy, spinal stenosis, obesity, as well as others with very different conditions, may all share this same symptom.

Losing our balance, slipping on ice or a wet floor, missing a step or stumbling over an obstacle can all cause trauma and result in pain throughout various parts of the body.

This chronic condition, which can be difficult to diagnose, results in pain throughout the body and a feeling of exhaustion that can last for months at a time. Fibromyalgia affects more women than men, and most often develops during early and middle adulthood.

This condition is a loss of motion or stiffness in the shoulder, usually accompanied by pain in the joint. Frozen shoulder is most common in people between the ages of 40 and 60, but can afflict anyone regardless of gender, arm preference or occupation.

This condition is a deterioration of the facet joints, which help stabilize the spine and limit excessive motion. The facet joints are lined with cartilage and are surrounded by a lubricating capsule that enables the vertebrae to bend and twist.

This condition is a painful inflammation of the iliotibial band, a thick, tendon-like portion of a muscle that travels from the hip down the outer side of the thigh to the knee. ITBS results in pain, aggravated by activity, that is usually felt on the outer side of the knee.

This condition, also called stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, is an inflammation of the sheath that wraps around the tendons at the thumb side of the wrist.

This condition is an inflammation of a part of the tendon that connects the biceps muscle to the radius bone at the elbow.

There are three different types of arthritis that can occur in knees:  Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid arthritis, and post traumatic arthritis.  Osteoarthritis, most common, is progressive and usually stirkes after middle age. The joint cartilage slowly deteriorates over time.  Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory diseases and can occur at any age. It tends to worsen over time.  Post-Traumatic arthritis occurs yeras after a torn meniscus, injury
to a ligament or a fracture of the knee.

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Sometimes called ataxia, this condition can be caused by a number of diseases and/or injuries. Toxins, such as drugs or alcohol can also affect coordination. Movements may appear jerky and unsteady, and simple activities requiring fine motor skills may be difficult.

This condition, commonly called tennis elbow, is a degeneration of the tendons that attach to the lateral epicondyle, the bony bump on the outer side of the elbow.

This condition, commonly called tennis elbow, is a degeneration of the tendons that attach to the lateral epicondyle, the bony bump on the outer side of the elbow.

This condition, also known as Little League elbow, is an injury to the medial epicondyle growth plate. It causes pain in the elbow, and may cause swelling. This condition is most common in young baseball pitchers.

This condition is a degeneration of the tendons that bend the wrist toward the palm of the hand. These tendons are located above the medial epicondyle, the bony bump on the inner side of the elbow. Although this condition is often referred to as golfer’s elbow, medial epicondylitis can be caused by any repetitious use of these muscles.

This condition is an injury to the medial ulnar collateral ligament, a ligament composed of three bands located on the inner side of the elbow. The MUCL connects the humerus to the ulna. Injury to the MUCL can cause pain, weakness and sometimes a feeling of instability in the arm

A disorder of the flow of fluids in the inner ear, Meniere’s disease symptoms include vertigo, ringing or buzzing in the ear and hearing loss.

The meniscus is comprised of two c-shaped wedges of cartilage that cushion and stabilize the knee joint. A torn meniscus can cause pain and limited mobility in the knee.

A migraine is a common type of headache that may occur with symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, or sensitivity to light. In many people, a throbbing pain is felt only on one side of the head. Some people who get migraines have warning symptoms, called an aura, before the actual headache begins.

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Myofascial Pain Syndrome is caused by injury or damage to the fascia, the soft, stretchy connective tissue that surrounds muscles, organs and other structures inside the body. The syndrome causes chronic pain in muscles throughout the body, especially in the neck and jaw.

Myofascial Pain Syndrome is caused by injury or damage to the fascia, the soft, stretchy connective tissue that surrounds muscles, organs and other structures inside the body. The syndrome causes chronic pain in muscles throughout the body, especially in the neck and jaw.

Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative arthritis, is a degenerative condition that commonly affects the small joints of the fingers and the base of the thumb. Common in both men and women, it can cause the joints to become swollen, stiff and painful. It often leads to joint enlargement, interfering with normal hand function and significantly impacting a person’s quality of life. There are two main types of hand arthritis: primary generalized osteoarthritis and erosive osteoarthritis, and they affect the hands differently.

Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative arthritis, is a gradual breakdown of cartilage in the joints. Cartilage is a tough, flexible connective tissue that protects the ends of bones in the joints. Osteoarthritis is common in the knees because the knees bear the weight of the body. Osteoarthritis of the knee can severely impact a person’s lifestyle

Overuse injures can cause pain and other problems in the elbow, forearm, wrist and hand. These injuries typically affect athletes and people who perform repetitive motions. Children and adolescents, whose bones have not yet matured, and factory workers are particularly susceptible to overuse injuries.

This painful condition results from damage to the peripheral nervous system – the nerves that travel from the spinal cord to the limbs and organs.

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This condition is an inflammation of one or both peroneal tendons, which travel down the lower leg, behind the lateral malleolus and along the outer side of the ankle.

This condition, common among amputees, is a painful sensation that seems to originate in a missing limb. It is different from stump pain, which is pain in the stump of an amputated limb generally caused by overuse or a poorly-fitting prosthesis.

This condition is an irritation of the sciatic nerve, a thick nerve that branches from the lumbar spine and travels through the buttocks and down the back of each leg. An irritation of the sciatic nerve can result in radiating pain or numbness from the buttocks down through the legs.

Plantar fasciitis is an irritation of the plantar fascia. This thick band of connective tissue travels across the bottom of the foot between the toes and the heel. It supports the foot’s natural arch. It stretches and becomes taut whenever the foot bears weight.

Post laminectomy syndrome, also called failed back syndrome, is a continuous and chronic pain that can develop after certain types of back surgery.

This condition is thought to be a compression injury to the radial nerve near the elbow. This condition is often confused with tennis elbow.

Rheumatoid arthritis, a condition of the immune system that can attack joints throughout the body, commonly affects the foot and ankle. It can make walking painful and difficult.

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that cover the head of the humerus and hold it in the shoulder socket. When rotator cuff tendons become damaged, the shoulder can become stiff, sore or lose mobility. Injuries are often caused by direct damage, such as a traumatic fall or repetitive overhead motions. It can also develop because of indirect causes such as impingement or shoulder imbalance.

This condition is a painful swelling, usually along the front of the lower leg, that is common among runners and other athletes.

This condition occurs when the tendons of the rotator cuff, along with the subacromial bursa, become compressed against a bony scapula protrusion called the acromion. As these tissues continually rub against bone, they become irritated and inflamed.

This condition is a narrowing of the spinal canal that results from the degeneration of bones, discs, or joints in the cervical spine.

This condition affects the thoracic spine between the neck and the lower back. It is a narrowing of the spinal canal that results from degeneration of bones in the spine, disc herniation, or thickening of the tissues that surround the spinal cord.

In this condition, damage to bones or joints causes vertebrae to slip forward and distort the spinal cord. This animation will show two types of spondylolisthesis, degenerative and isthmic.

This condition is a degeneration of the spine that can affect the spine at any level, resulting in pain and discomfort that can grow worse over time.

Repetitive throwing places severe stress on the elbow joint. The throwing motion stretches the tendons and ligaments on the inner side of the elbow and compresses the structures on the outer side. These forces can damage tissue and bone, especially in young athletes whose bones have not fully matured.

This condition is an inflammation of the triceps tendon, which connects the triceps muscle to the elbow. Triceps tendonitis causes pain and limits movement in the arm.

This chronic condition is caused by a misfiring of the trigeminal nerve. An attack causes brief episodes of extreme, shooting pain.

The originating cause(s) for vertigo, room spinning, and illusion of movement.

Vertigo is the sense of rotation, rocking or the world spinning even when you are perfectly still. Dizziness and lightheadedness are also associated with vertigo and can be a result of a Central cause, originating in the brain or spinal cord; or a Peripheral Cause which stems from a problem in the inner ear.

The vestibular system includes parts of the inner ear and brain that control balance and eye movement. Impairments to this system may be caused by genetic  or environmental conditions.

Vertebral discs are the spinal column’s shock absorbers. The discs cushion the vertebral bones and allow the spine to twist and bend. Vertebral discs are composed of two main parts, a soft inner nucleus (nucleus pulposis) and a tough, fibrous outer wall (annulus fibrosis).

Vertebral discs are the spinal column’s shock absorbers. The discs cushion the vertebral bones and allow the spine to twist and bend. Vertebral discs are composed of two main parts, a soft inner nucleus (nucleus pulposis) and a tough, fibrous outer wall (annulus fibrosis).

Whiplash is usually the result of an auto accident, but an impact or force that causes the head to jerk forward or backward abruptly can also stretch and/or tear the muscles and tendons in the neck.

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Whiplash, also called cervical acceleration/ deceleration (or CAD) syndrome, is a neck injury commonly caused by car accidents, falls, and contact sports. It results from a quick, jerking motion that forces the neck beyond its normal range of motion.

Wrist sprains are common injuries that result when the wrist is forcefully bent or twisted beyond its normal range of motion, causing pain and instability in the joint.